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Where to Put a Bat House in Your Yard

If you’ve been having mosquito or insect control issues, then buying a bat house may be on your mind. Bat houses offer one of the best ways to control mosquitoes throughout your backyard and property.

Just like everything else in life - you have to install a bat house properly for it to work.

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Why Bats Make the Best Mosquito Eaters

How Many Mosquitoes Can Bats Eat?

Now we’re getting to the good stuff. The number of mosquitoes a bat can eat is what makes them so good at handling backyard mosquito control.

Bats may be smaller animals, but they certainly do eat a lot. Many a bat species can eat over 30% of their body weight in bugs - in under an hour! Think about that. No matter how hard you try, you cannot eat 30% of your weight in beef.

Due to these staggering numbers, a healthy and hungry bat can eat up to 1,200 bugs, insects, and mosquitoes in one single hour. That’s a lot of mosquitoes that won’t be biting your legs and ankles any longer.

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Where to Buy Bat Houses: Your Go-To Guide

So, you’re curious about where to buy bat houses? 

Before you buy a bat house, you need to look for one thing, and one thing only. Any bat house you buy must be BCI-Certified. Bat Conservation International certifies the best bat houses they test out each and every year.

In order to buy the best bat houses around, you should always stick with BCI-Certified products. This will ensure the homes are designed to attract the maximum number of bats.

Now that we’ve got that covered, let’s look at where to buy bat houses:

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Do Bats Eat Mosquitoes? Everything You Need to Know

So, do bats eat mosquitoes? Yes, and yes! But there’s more to the question. First, you need to know how to get bats to your property to eat the mosquitoes. Next, you need the bats to stay around. Finally, we need to talk about how many bats are required to fix your mosquito issues and what a bat’s diet consists of. So, let’s get started:

  • What Attracts Bats?

First and foremost, we need to attract bats to your property. Bats eat mosquitoes, but only when they’re around. So you need to get them to your home. This means you need to attract bats.

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11 Interesting Things to Know About Bat Houses

  • So we wanted to detail a few interesting things to know about these unique living quarters for our friendly flying mammal pals.

    11 Interesting Things to Know About Bat Houses

    Enough with the small talk. Let’s dive in and learn a little more about bat houses:

    • Like a Dead Tree

    Bats actually prefer to live in a dead tree more than anywhere else. A dead tree is nearly predator free, and the space between the bark offers great protection and allows a bat to squeeze in tightly

    Why do our favorite flying mammals enjoy bat houses so much? Because a high-quality bat house offers a similar sleeping environment to a dead tree.

    • More Art than Science

    There’s a variety of factors that determine whether a bat house gets filled up with mosquito-eating bats or not. It’s certainly not an exact science, and anyone who tells you it is - they’re lying.

    s or not. It’s certainly not an exact science, and anyone who tells you it is - they’re lying.

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14 Fascinating Facts About Bats

Bats bring balance to the environment by feeding on and thus controlling insect pests. Some species of bats eat fruits and in doing so they inadvertently help in spreading the seeds of these fruits. Overall bats are extremely beneficial to mankind. Here are some fun facts about bats.

  1. There are over 1250 species of bats. This is about a quarter of all species of mammals.
  2. Bats are the only mammals that fly.
  3. During spring, summer, and fall, North American bats eat over a third of their weight in insects every night. Millions of Bracken Cave bats in Texas eat hundreds of thousands of pounds of insects every night!
  4. Bats can see quite well, but hunt for food using echolocation. Echolocation is a means of locating objects by sending out a sound and then listening to the variations in the returning echo.

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